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Gurth  
#11 Posted : Tuesday, September 25, 2018 3:24:25 PM(UTC)
Gurth
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No doubt. I’m a regular listener of the Orvis podcast and I’ve learned a ton over the years that I’ve applied to targeting trout with spinners.

And like you say.... this all applies to all types of fishing.
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William Schlafer  
#12 Posted : Tuesday, September 25, 2018 5:14:54 PM(UTC)
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Funny you bring this up.

Last night, I was watching a YouTube video by Kelly Galloup on weighted vs unweighted fly patterns. Kelly tends to drone on a bit, but his experience and success as a fly tier and fisherman makes his comments hard to ignore.

He said something interesting in this video around the 1:40 mark:



"...if it's a cloudy day, it behooves you to take the flash off your fly. Trash fish like shiny things, Trout, not so much."


This is pretty much opposite of what I've always been told or read. Flashy stuff is supposed to be a trigger to induce reluctant Trout to strike. Kelly was talking about bead-heads in this case, but the idea is the same.

Awhile ago I had an experienced fly tier looking at some of my larger streamers where I used lots of long flash material dangling along the body and a bright gold cone head. I thought it looked cool, but he wasn't impressed. His comment was "get rid of most of that flash and switch to a black or dark colored cone head." I'd had success with this pattern in the past so I didn't bother changing it. But now it's got me thinking about all the refusals I seem to get on darker or cloudy days. There is an old adage about Trout fishing that says: dark patterns on cloudy days, brighter ones under sunny skies."

Is Kelly correct about avoiding lots of flash on flies (or spinners) under dark skies?


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
Gurth  
#13 Posted : Tuesday, September 25, 2018 5:51:35 PM(UTC)
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That's the thing though... not always.

I've had spectacular days using a gold flashy blade when it's overcast.

I've had sunny days when they'd take nothing but an all black body and spinner.


I believe that last night's trigger was the sudden change. Had it been overcast all day, it's entirely possible that the warhorse gold blade/black body would have been as effective as ever.


I think the key is knowing the tendencies and norms but not being a slave to them.

If something isn't working, I don't get hung up on the fact that it SHOULD be working.

I change things up.


.

Edited by user Tuesday, September 25, 2018 5:53:40 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
William Schlafer  
#14 Posted : Tuesday, September 25, 2018 7:16:53 PM(UTC)
William Schlafer
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The last couple of weeks have been odd, for lack of a better term. The fishing was alternately hot and cold. Even when conditions seemed perfect, the Trout seemed to have other things in mind. Definitely the change of the season, and perhaps even the sun angle might play a part with the days getting increasingly shorter.

Actually looking forward to the possibility of fishing with some rain later this week. Although a couple forecasts have overnight low temps in the 30s which will slow things down a bit until it warms up. Definitely not in the summer fishing pattern anymore.


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
Pete  
#15 Posted : Tuesday, September 25, 2018 8:48:43 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: William Schlafer Go to Quoted Post
Funny you bring this up.

Last night, I was watching a YouTube video by Kelly Galloup on weighted vs unweighted fly patterns. Kelly tends to drone on a bit, but his experience and success as a fly tier and fisherman makes his comments hard to ignore.

He said something interesting in this video around the 1:40 mark:



"...if it's a cloudy day, it behooves you to take the flash off your fly. Trash fish like shiny things, Trout, not so much."


This is pretty much opposite of what I've always been told or read. Flashy stuff is supposed to be a trigger to induce reluctant Trout to strike. Kelly was talking about bead-heads in this case, but the idea is the same.

Awhile ago I had an experienced fly tier looking at some of my larger streamers where I used lots of long flash material dangling along the body and a bright gold cone head. I thought it looked cool, but he wasn't impressed. His comment was "get rid of most of that flash and switch to a black or dark colored cone head." I'd had success with this pattern in the past so I didn't bother changing it. But now it's got me thinking about all the refusals I seem to get on darker or cloudy days. There is an old adage about Trout fishing that says: dark patterns on cloudy days, brighter ones under sunny skies."

Is Kelly correct about avoiding lots of flash on flies (or spinners) under dark skies?


-Bill




I've adhered to the bright fly/bright day, dark fly/dark day in the past. But I always thought it was because fish have a harder time detecting color in darker conditions. Same reason I don't bother to use a red fly when night fishing: they can't see the color, so what would be the point? Giving them a good silhouette becomes more important in low-light conditions. But on a bright day, just because they can see red or yellow or green, doesn't mean they'll want to eat it. The fish apparently don't read the same books I read, so it's best to be flexible: if fly selection based on conventional wisdom isn't producing, give something different, maybe radically different, a try.

That's interesting to hear an experienced tier tell you to go darker and less flashy. I suppose it is less likely to spook fish and one can always try something brighter or flashier if dark and subtle doesn't produce But once you spook the fish, as would be the case if you threw something too bright at them first, it's game over for that day.

Never noticed if I catch more chubs and shiners while using flashy flies.
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