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Twill89  
#1 Posted : Sunday, January 7, 2018 7:45:31 PM(UTC)
Twill89
Rank: Midge

Joined: 9/11/2016(UTC)
Posts: 2
Location: Madison,WI

I’m just curious if anyone has ever attempted to swing some flies, or maybe use a switch rod to fish subsurface for smallmouth on the Wisconsin?

If nothing else, it seems like a good way to reach a larger swath from shore, but would it help to catch fish...?

Any thoughts or experience? Any ideas on set up of anyone has tried it?

Thanks and Happy Trout season 2018!
Pete  
#2 Posted : Sunday, January 7, 2018 10:09:01 PM(UTC)
Pete
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Glad you asked-I asked a similar question a couple of months ago. There's no reason it shouldn't work. In fact, it should be pretty straightforward: I'd think it should be possible to use a floating line and a lightly weighted fly, especially in some of the riffle areas. When smallmouths are chasing baitfish up in the water column, there's no need to dredge bottom; I think not having to avoid lead eyed flies or heavy lines makes casting much more enjoyable. In fact, Spey casting could be pretty effective as far as covering water in the Wisconsin for more than just smallmouth. You could put a fly in front of a lot of pike, muskies and walleyes with Spey casts. Although the walleyes would probably require a sink tip which makes the casting more work.

Most of the guys I know who use Spey and Switch rods for smallmouths use Skagit heads (I learned on a Scandi head and have gotten comfortable with that). What are your thoughts on Skagit v. Scandi for the Wisconsin River?
NDFlatlander  
#3 Posted : Monday, January 8, 2018 3:02:57 AM(UTC)
NDFlatlander
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Pete, fly size (or resistance in casting) would probably be the the biggest consideration in casting style. You can throw larger bulkier stuff easier with a skagit system, but slimmer lighter patterns work well with a scandi system. I can achieve greater distances with a scandi set up, but throw larger stuff with a skagit. Also,if wind is a factor, skagit will win all day. I would say have both at the ready and swap heads for the conditions at hand.

Tight loops.
thanks 1 user thanked NDFlatlander for this useful post.
Pete on 1/8/2018(UTC)
Pete  
#4 Posted : Monday, January 8, 2018 7:10:48 PM(UTC)
Pete
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Joined: 6/30/2011(UTC)
Posts: 501
Location: Far west suburbs of Chicago

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Originally Posted by: NDFlatlander Go to Quoted Post
Pete, fly size (or resistance in casting) would probably be the the biggest consideration in casting style. You can throw larger bulkier stuff easier with a skagit system, but slimmer lighter patterns work well with a scandi system. I can achieve greater distances with a scandi set up, but throw larger stuff with a skagit. Also,if wind is a factor, skagit will win all day. I would say have both at the ready and swap heads for the conditions at hand.

Tight loops.


thanks for the helpful info. That matters when contrasting throwing small wets for trout or steelhead versus heaving big leeches or streamers for smallmouths; that's where the Skagit head would be more appropriate.
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