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NBrevitz  
#21 Posted : Thursday, March 14, 2019 5:18:18 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: MN Driftless Go to Quoted Post
Just to be clear, heritage does not mean native.

https://www.dnr.state.mn...mar-apr/brook-trout.html


There are supposed to be several creeks near the Baraboo Ridge with truly native Brookies, and no stocking influence. I’ve heard conflicting things on the MN Heritage fish. The fish I caught on a tiny Zumbro trib definitely seemed a bit different. Sadly, even that thing is now overrun with Browns. They’re like Carp, they take over anything.

I think it’s very interesting how Browns generally fail miserable on the N Shore, but Brookies do pretty well.
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Gurth  
#22 Posted : Thursday, March 14, 2019 2:35:20 PM(UTC)
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So I harassed my fisheries biologist about the term heritage as it relates to Wisconsin brook trout. This is the applicable sections of the email exchange:


Regarding "heritage"… I've always took it to mean that these are trout that haven't been stocked at any time and are the descendants of the trout that have always been here – not mixed with eastern or any other stockers.

Do I have that right? Do populations of genetically pure Wisconsin brook trout still exist?


"Yes, the “Heritage” strain is thought to be the driftless area genetics that have been here all along, with no to very little mixing. I say no to very little mixing as there is no guarantee there was never any stocked fish. We are getting those genetics into the hatchery program."


Take out the guarantee that these are pure and I'm going with the possibility/likelihood that they are. The DNR thinks so even if they aren't willing to guarantee it.

Of course an egg could have hitched a ride on a heron foot or duck's ass and then all bets are off.

Flapper


.

Edited by user Thursday, March 14, 2019 5:37:35 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

“Harvest eaters... release trophies.” -Gurth
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shebs  
#23 Posted : Thursday, March 21, 2019 12:06:37 AM(UTC)
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Brook Trout Distribution, Genetics, and Population Characteristics in the Driftless Area of Minnesota

There is some question about the 'native' status of brook trout in MN, and this is the best academic source I've yet found that explores this. Scroll about halfway down to download the full PDF. Long story short, a few drainages have genetic lineages not associated with any known hatchery source, but this does not necessarily mean they are descendants of true native brookies.
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s.t.fanatic  
#24 Posted : Thursday, March 21, 2019 4:38:24 PM(UTC)
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And this is why Miller, Snook, and Viker aren't hung up on "heritage." The true nature of these fish—whether they are actually the descendants of Minnesota brook trout that evolved here—isn't really the point. The point is that these fish are genetically distinct, despite a century of mixing with known eastern fish.
NBrevitz  
#25 Posted : Thursday, March 21, 2019 6:38:45 PM(UTC)
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I’d love to see, maybe even get involved with the establishment of native Brook Trout in the hatcheries. It’d be interesting to electroshock out Browns and re-establish the native Brookies on systems with a hard barrier. Lots of creeks in Jackson and Trempeleau Counties with dams...🤔

As for the mutts, I still think they belong a hell of a lot more than something from Europe and the Mediterranean, or the west coast. The fish are starting to naturalize again, look at the success with the WI wild strain Brookie program.

There arent a ton of pure Brook Trout strains left, but far more so than Browns. A lot of the Brook Trout’s northern habitat is relatively intact, and since stocking was never required in the first place, those fish are pure. Get to the northern fringes of Ontario roads and you’ll find natives.

Browns have been sent all over the world (thanks Brits), and Scottish fish were stocked on top of German fish when Browns were first brought to this country. Our naturalized strains are very unique as well. They’ve selected a wild strain from Michigan for stocking, as their success in the wild has been excellent.

There may only be a few truly pure stream Rainbows left in the world as well, some fish sent to Argentina probably 140 years ago. Other than that, cross breeding with migratory smolts, redband Trout, and even a few Cutties and Goldens have made our hatchery stocks largely frankenfish. They find Rainbows trying to migrate down to the Mississippi every year, Steelhead genetics don’t hide.
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JGF  
#26 Posted : Thursday, March 21, 2019 11:30:12 PM(UTC)
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No rotenone involved but last night at the Coulee Region meeting we heard about plans for another Vernon County Brook Trout only section above a PL structure. I think this is the way to go as if you don't have a physical barrier, you probably aren't going to get rid of Brown Trout for more than a few years. Even with a physical barrier, with the floods we've had, it has to be a pretty significant one.
s.t.fanatic  
#27 Posted : Friday, March 22, 2019 1:56:13 PM(UTC)
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East and West Beaver Creek above Shecks Mill Dam would be a fantastic Brookie fishery if they'd get the browns out.
NBrevitz  
#28 Posted : Friday, March 22, 2019 6:46:33 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: s.t.fanatic Go to Quoted Post
East and West Beaver Creek above Shecks Mill Dam would be a fantastic Brookie fishery if they'd get the browns out.


I’ve caught tons of Brookies already in W Beaver, but yeah exactly! Cold healthy stuff that will be resilient to climate change, let’s get those streams all Brookie while it’s easier!
"I fish because I love to: Because only in the woods can I find solitude without loneliness."
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